Advertisements
Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Mark Bittman’

I hadn’t planned on making these cookies for a blog post, but they turned out so good that I felt it would only be fair to share. Adam and I are going to a Spanish themed dinner tonight at our Chef/Geologist friend’s house and these not too sweet cookies seemed like an appropriate offering. They are surprisingly simple and quick to make, and if you didn’t know any better, you’d think there was a stick of butter in each morsel.

© Dina Avila
These pictures are shot more informally than usual. My kitchen is my studio and I usually lay everything out with deliberation and intent with my camera secured to my tripod. Today, I just popped on a fast lens and shot free hand with the cookies resting in their traveling receptacle. Quick and easy just like these cookies.

Cheers!

Olive Oil Saffron Cookies

I gleaned this recipe from Mark Bittman’s blog. I only tweaked it a little bit by adding a hair more salt than the pinch he recommended and by replacing the orange zest and Grand Mariner with lemon zest and whiskey.

What you’ll need~

A small pinch of saffron threads

2 cups all-purpose flour

1/4 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

3/4 cup sugar

1/2 olive oil

2 eggs

Zest from one lemon

2 tablespoons whiskey

Lavender sugar and or coarse sea salt for dusting, optional

Preheat your oven to 350.

Add one tablespoon of boiling water to a pinch of saffron in a medium bowl. Swirl the water in bowl around and let sit for about a minute.

Stir the flour, baking soda and salt in a large bowl.

Using a stand or a hand mixer, add the sugar and olive oil to the saffron and beat until light. About 1-2 minutes.

Add the eggs and beat until the mixture gets creamy and fluffy.

Beat in the lemon zest and the whiskey.

Stir in the wet mix to the dry mix.

Drop spoonfuls (about two teaspoons) of the dough onto a parchment lined baking sheet.

Bake for 12 minutes, turning the pan halfway through, until the bottoms of the cookies are golden.

Dust with lavender sugar and or coarse sea salt.

© Dina Avila

© Dina Avila

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: